Tree Photography Tips & Tricks (and 47+ Tree Photos to Inspire You!)


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/einirwynleigh/25193851578/

Ever since I was young, trees have always seemed like wise and magnificent creatures.

There’s something timeless about them that makes you feel like they’ve been here far longer than we have.

And usually that’s true. With many species of trees living for hundreds and sometimes even thousands of years.

Photographing trees is like capturing a piece of history.

Of course, you can photograph trees anytime of the year. Just walk outside, go to a park, or get up-close for some nice tree bark shots.

But if you’re wanting to capture specific trees when they’re blooming or in their full fall-color glory, then you’ll want to check an online calendar to see when your tree will be at its peak.

But in my book, any day is a great day to get out in nature and capture some tree photography. They’re photogenic all year round. Whether they’re full of fall color, shading the sun, or dusted with snow.

In many ways, trees are easier to photograph because they sit still, allowing you to compose the shot exactly as you see fit.

You can focus on the leaves, the bark, the roots, the canopy, the flowers, or the full profile.

Each angle presents a new character trait.

Different lighting and weather conditions can also create new and interesting moods. Whether you’re shooting trees in the fog, spring blossoms, snow-covered trees, dense forests, or simply shooting at different times of the day.

Everytime you go out into nature, it gives you a new and interesting challenge. And to me, that’s half the fun of photography. Capturing the feeling. Sharing what we
“see”.

Trails

I love hiking and trails provide endless photo opportunities. Especially early in the morning as the fog begins to rise and the sun peaks its way through the trees.

Here are a few examples of trail photos to inspire your next outing.

Trail in the Forest

 

There’s nothing quite like a trail going through the old mossy pine forest.

Last year when we were in Asheville, North Carolina we drove up the Great Smoky Mountains. Towards the top we got out to do some hiking and the smell of pine
in the crisp air was just incredible.

So much so that we’re doing it again this year. In fact, Asheville in general is a great spot for lots of different photo opportunities.

Photograph trees at different times of the year.

There’s nothing quite like the first snowfall.

I love the look of snow sitting atop the branches. Exploring a winter wonderland.

The Corridor

Although I have to admit, I’m also partial to the spring when new life is just beginning to bloom.

Here’s a spring day in the woods.

The bluebells have created a carpet of flowers! That’s one of my favorite things about nature photography, it brings new and interesting perspectives all year round.

In fact, you could do an entire series of tree photography.

Starting with the first snowfall, capturing the first blooms of spring, and finally the many colors of fall.

Seek out different types of trees.

I love the mossy oaks in South Carolina.

Under the Mossy Oak by Stacy White on 500px.com

On the tropical side, there’s nothing better than a good palm tree.

Abandoned Beach by Jeri Peier on 500px.com

In Hawaii I loved the palm trees and especially the sunsets over the water. A sight to behold.

Capture Epic Tree Trunks

I love anything that looks like its from the Lord of the Rings.

Here’s a banyan tree with a magnificent root structure.

falling leaves by Lilly Pilly on 500px.com

You can use your 50mm lens to capture some great shots of both tree trunks and their detailed maze of roots.

Tree Moss.

While exploring the vegetation around the tree trunk, you’ll often find beautiful moss. This is especially true in more wooded areas.

Tree moss can make for great photographs, especially when you get the light just right.

Roots by Janis Balodis on 500px.com

The interesting thing about moss is that it has no roots. Instead, it uses tiny threads to anchor itself wherever it grows. On tree trunks, stones, or shady ground.

The Lone Tree.

I’m not sure why these are so popular, but the solo tree seems to be one of the most coveted finds in the photography world.

But a single lonely tree with a landscape backdrop does seem to provide an endless number of photo opportunities and compositions.

So… where do you find one of these prized photo opportunities?

Farmland and meadows are common spots where you’ll find a lone tree.

But you can also be on the lookout anytime you’re on a car drive or out for a walk. They can pop up just about anywhere.

When you find your prized lone tree, make sure it has plenty of white space around it with no other distractions in the frame.

This will put the focus on your tree while highlighting another aspect of the landscape. This could often be grass or flowers in the foreground of the photo.

By shooting from a low angle, you can get a shot with just the sky in the background. This is great when you really want your tree stand out. Or you just want to try out a new composition.

Lone Tree.

Lone tree 2

Lone Tree - Take Eight

Milky way and tree by Iván Ferrero on 500px.com

Tree Reflections.

Early morning is one of the best times to capture the perfect reflection. This is when you’ll have the best chance of capturing your photo while the water is flat and calm.

Any amount of wind can cause ripples and blur your reflection.

To capture the perfect tree reflection you’ll need great light (as always), some water, no wind, and your favorite tree.

Solitary Reflection by Brad Grove on 500px.com

Rows of Trees.

There’s something about rows of trees that always make me smile.

Especially when they create a canopy with a trail underneath.

I’m pretty sure that’s my heaven… or the entrance to my dream home.

Overture by Keith Briley on 500px.com

These lines of trees create great symmetry and offer the perfect photo opportunity. Especially in the morning when the fog is rising.

But you can get great shots of tree lined roads nearly anytime of day.

You can often find this arrangement on old country roads, city streets and parks.

You can also use your camera’s grid to line up the shot with perfect symmetry.

Highlight the leaves against a blue sky.

You can bring the leaves into full focus when you put the blue sky in the background.

Jumble of Blazing Color

Fall Together by Nicholas Yee on 500px.com

Clashing Colors

With a 50mm-70mm lens you can capture some nice detailed shots and create a great bokeh effect.

Photograph Fallen Leaves.

Fall isn’t just about capturing the gorgeous array of colors.

You can also photograph the fallen leaves – signifying the coming of winter.

If the leaves have just fallen, they’ll still have some gorgeous colors. These photos tell a story in and of themselves.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/shandilee/10226360845/

Tree Bark

The great thing about photographing tree bark is that you can do it all year long. Every tree has its own unique texture. The oak tree is rough and rugged while the sycamore has smooth, soft bark.

You can capture tree bark up close or at a variety of different angles.

Twisted tree bark

Tree Bark 05

autumn evening by wayofart.ch  on 500px.com

Up a Tree by Doug Parks on 500px.com

Observe the world in details and little things by Janek Sedlar on 500px.com

Cold Tree by Forrest Mankins on 500px.com

Include people in your photo to provide scale.

Some of the largest trees in the U.S. can be found in the Giant Forest of Sequoia National Park. The largest tree in this park is called General Sherman which is a breathtaking 274.9 feet tall with a circumference of 102.6 feet at its base.

To get any idea of the massive scale of this tree, you would need to include something in the image for scale.

With trees, people are a great addition. In fact, with this massive tree you could line up multiple people to give an idea of it’s grandeur and scale.

Have FUN!

Most importantly… just have fun.

To me, that’s the only rule when it comes to photography.

People will give you lots of suggestions and ideas, but what’s the point if you’re not having fun.

Get creative. Get outside. And go explore.

If you are looking, photo opportunities will be everywhere.

And finally – a bit of inspiration and eye candy.

Here are 47+ more tree photos for those of you who just can’t get enough 🙂

 

 


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nickerwin/36647273304/

This photo is called Autumn in the path. Taken by Nicholas Erwin.

Believe it or not, this photo was actually taken on the Samsung Galaxy S7. I love the sunlight and the shadows. And some pretty amazing bokeh for a phone camera.

For the camera geeks: He used a shutter speed of 1/480. An aperture of ƒ/1.7. Focal length of 4.2 mm and ISO 50.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/theo_reth/8190837955/

This photo was taken by Theophilos Papadopoulos. It’s called Riverside leaves.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 500D using a 17-50mm lens. A shutter speed of 1/30. An aperture of ƒ/4.5. Focal length of 50.0 mm and ISO 100.

I love this macro scene. Beautiful detail and wonderfully warm tones.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/wefi_official/15948310505/

Could these fall colors get any better? Wonderful tones and texture.

This picture was taken by Anne Worner. It’s called Fall In Love All Over Again.

It was shot on a Olympus E-M5 using a OLYMPUS M.45mm F1.8 lens. A shutter speed of 1/20. An aperture of ƒ/11.0. Focal length of 45.0 mm and ISO 200.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rodneycampbell/16381102767/

This lovely black and white photo was taken on Kangaroo Island.

It’s called Luminous Tunnel. Taken by Rodney Campbell.

It was shot on a Nikon D600 with a shutter speed of 1/80. An aperture of ƒ/5.6. Focal length of 70.0 mm and ISO 320.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/david_e_smith/3219399767/

This photo is called The magic of Winter. Taken by David Smith

It was shot on a Nikon D60 using a shutter speed of 1/60. An aperture of ƒ/13.0. Focal length of 18.0 mm and ISO 400.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gomera/42979051631/

This photo feels almost magical to me. I feel like I’m in a scene from Lord of the Rings.

It’s called Laurel Forest. Taken by Jörg Bergmann.

It was shot on a Panasonic DMC-GF7 using a LUMIX G 20/F1.7 lens. A shutter speed of 0.5. An aperture of ƒ/5.6. Focal length of 20.0 mm and ISO 200.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/sacharules/12554699855/

This photo is called Walking Amongst Giants at Togakushi Shrine, Nagano. Taken by Sacha Fernandez. Beautiful lines of Japanese Cedar trees.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 5D Mark II using a EF35mm f/1.4L USM lens. A shutter speed of 1/8. An aperture of ƒ/8.0. Focal length of 35.0 mm and ISO 100.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/antrover/41794257732/

This photo is called Somewhere… I Wanna Go There With You. Taken by John Westrock. Lovely moss and a gorgeous view.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 5D Mark III with a EF16-35mm f/4L IS USM lens. A shutter speed of 1/80. An aperture of ƒ/11.0. Focal length of 18.0 mm and ISO 400.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/127339305@N05/15435102982/

This photograph was taken by Ludovic Lubeigt. It’s called Path of the Bamboo – Arashiyama.

It was shot on a Panasonic DMC-GF5 using a LUMIX G 20/F1.7 II lens. A shutter speed of 4. An aperture of ƒ/6.3. Focal length of 20.0 mm and ISO 160.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tonyarmstrong/15532715476/

This ancient Cornish woodland was taken by Tony Armstrong. It’s called Misty Morning.

It was shot on a Canon EOS-1D X with a EF24-70mm f/2.8L II USM lens. A shutter speed of 2. An aperture of ƒ/8.0. Focal length of 31.0 mm and ISO 100.

 


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/neillwphoto/15617318298/

I love the lighting in this nature scene.

This photo is called Autumn Trail. Taken by Neil Williamson.

It was shot on a Pentax K-r with a smc PENTAX-DA L 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 AL lens. A shutter speed of 1/40. An aperture of ƒ/3.5. Focal length of 18.0 mm and ISO 100.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lennykphotography/24196168693/

This photo is called Lonely Autumn Path. Taken by Lenny K Photography.

It was shot on a Leica Camera AG Leica M using a Summilux-M 1:1.4/50 ASPH. lens. A shutter speed of 1/125. An aperture of ƒ/2.8. Focal length of 50.0 mm and ISO 1000.

Adobe Photoshop Elements 14.0 was used to enhance the reds in the leaves, some lighting adjustments, a slight vignette, and add a blue filter to the mist.

 


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisschoenbohm/14865884322/

This beautiful Spanish Moss was photographed by Chris Ford.

It was taken in Savannah, Georgia where the moss grows without roots and decorates these enormous oak trees.

This photo shot on a Apple iPhone 5s with a shutter speed of 1/240. An aperture of ƒ/2.2. Focal length of 4.1 mm and ISO 32.

 


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hannesflo/38806209520/

This frozen scene was taken by Hannes Flo. It’s called 100 Suns.

It was shot on a Sony Alpha a6000 with a FE 55mm F1.8 ZA lens. A shutter speed of 1/60. An aperture of ƒ/8.0. Focal length of 55.0 mm and ISO 160.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/einirwynleigh/25193851578/

There’s something about these vibrant colors and streams of light that make me feel like I’m IN the photo.

This gorgeous photo is called Into the Woods. Photographed and composed by Einir Wyn Leigh.

It was shot on a Nikon D300 using a 10.0-20.0 mm f/4.0-5.6 lens. A shutter speed of 1/10. An aperture of ƒ/5.6. Focal length of 10.0 mm and ISO 320.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/97423979@N00/37731183501/

The Spanish Moss surrounding this cemetery makes for a beautiful scene.

This photo was taken by Neal Wellons. It was shot on a Fujifilm X100S with a shutter speed of 1/300. An aperture of ƒ/5.6. Focal length of 23.0 mm and ISO 800.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/kennethgarcia/8666891322/

This photo reminds me of small town USA.

It’s called The Oaks of Coral Way. Photographed and composed by Kenneth Garcia.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 60D using a EF-S18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens. A shutter speed of 1/60. An aperture of ƒ/5.0. Focal length of 60.0 mm and ISO 400.

 


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/giuseppemilo/19526155168/

This photo was shot in Yosemite National Park by Giuseppe Milo.

It was shot on a Sony Alpha a6000 with a shutter speed of 1/100. An aperture of 1/100. Focal length of 100 and ISO 100.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/giuseppemilo/24372702392/

This stunning landscape photo was also taken by Giuseppe Milo in the  Yosemite Valley.

It was shot on a Sony a6000 with a shutter speed of 1.6. An aperture of 1.6. Focal length of 100 and ISO 100.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisschoenbohm/6288866486/

This photo was captured by Chris Ford in New York City’s Central Park. It’s called ‘American Elm’ because the sidewalk is lined with American Elm trees.

I especially love the curvy branches. They remind of the legs of an octopus.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 5D Mark II with a Canon 24mm-105mm lens. A shutter speed of 2. An aperture of ƒ/8.0. Focal length of 24.0 mm and ISO 50.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/west-park/3100261521/

I love the texture in this photograph.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 400D. A shutter speed of 1/400. An aperture of ƒ/4.0. Focal length of 60.0 mm and ISO 400.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lng0004/12327411574/

This photo was taken in Charleston-Savannah on a beautiful oak avenue. Captured by photographer Linh Nguyen. This is one of my favorites as I can never get enough Spanish moss.

It was shot on a Sony NEX-7 with a shutter speed of 1/160. An aperture of 1/160. Focal length of 100 and ISO 100.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ralphandjenny/5941090415/

This picture was taken by Ralph Daily.

It was shot on a Fujifilm FinePix X100 with a shutter speed of 1/20. An aperture of ƒ/16.0. Focal length of 23.0 mm and ISO 800.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tom_hall_nz/15234539654/

This photo is called Feeling small. Taken by Tom Hall. Such a great angle and perspective.

It was shot on a Nikon D5100 using a 11.0-16.0 mm f/2.8 lens.


Source: https://jackkennard.com/

This picture was taken by Jack Kennard. It’s called Trees on Amelia Island. The amazing trees. The vines. The Spanish moss. This photo has it all.

It was shot on a Nikon D5200 using a 18.0-140.0 mm f/3.5-5.6 lens. A shutter speed of 1/200. An aperture of ƒ/8.0. Focal length of 30.0 mm and ISO 320.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/mhx/24830241312/

This photo is called The Windswept Trees at Slope Point. Taken by Marcus Holland-Moritz.

It was shot on a Sony DSLR-A700 with a DT 16-80mm F3.5-4.5 ZA lens. A shutter speed of 1/200. An aperture of ƒ/11.0. Focal length of 30.0 mm and ISO 200.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gomera/37502774946/

This incredible photo was taken by Jörg Bergmann in the Garajonay National Park.

It was shot on a Panasonic DMC-GM1 using a LUMIX G VARIO 12-32/F3.5-5.6 lens. A shutter speed of 1/500. An aperture of ƒ/5.0. Focal length of 13.0 mm and ISO 640.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/captainkimo/8645875172/

These beautiful banyan trees were captured by photographer Kim Seng.

It was shot on a Canon EOS REBEL T2i with a shutter speed of 1/15. An aperture of ƒ/5.0. Focal length of 65.0 mm and ISO 100.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rod_waddington/15534298672/

This photo is called Dragon’s Blood Tree. It was taken by Rod Waddington on Socotra Island.

It was shot on a Nikon D600 using a AF-S Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens. A shutter speed of 1/1000. An aperture of ƒ/13.0. Focal length of 38.0 mm and ISO 3200.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernd_thaller/25782909758/

This picture was taken by Bernd Thaller. It’s called Sun Breaks through the Clouds.

It was shot on a Nikon D800 using a 14.0-24.0 mm f/2.8 lens. A shutter speed of 1/500. An aperture of ƒ/11.0. Focal length of 18.0 mm and ISO 400.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ianmartinez/14008503686/

This picture was taken by Christian Ronnel. It’s called Blood Moon.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 70D using a TAMRON SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD A011 lens. A shutter speed of 1/200. An aperture of ƒ/6.3. Focal length of 600.0 mm and ISO 100.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jwhitesmith/42454252251/

This photo is called Winskill Light. Taken by James Whitesmith. Such a beautiful capture of the sun setting at Winskill Stones Nature Reserve.

It was shot on a Sony ILCE-7M2 with a FE 16-35mm F4 ZA OSS lens. A shutter speed of 1/10. An aperture of ƒ/16.0. Focal length of 17.0 mm and ISO 100.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/davdenic/15902880042/

This photograph was taken by David Denicolò. It’s called Sitting on the Giant feet, Mariposa Grove.

It was shot on a Olympus E-M5 using an OLYMPUS M.9-18mm F4.0-5.6 lens. A shutter speed of 1/250. An aperture of ƒ/6.3. Focal length of 9.0 mm and ISO 1600.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/xerones/141357725/

These beautiful cherry blossoms were photographed in Harrogate, North Yorkshire.

It was shot on a Canon Digital IXUS 700 with a shutter speed of 1/250. An aperture of ƒ/4.9. Focal length of 23.1 mm and ISO 200.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/darwinbell/5546096544/

This beautiful macro shot was taken by Darwin Bell. It’s called Spring has sprung.

It was shot on a Olympus E-PL1 with a shutter speed of 1/250. An aperture of ƒ/8.0. Focal length of 23.0 mm and ISO 200.


Source: cherry blossoms

These famous cherry blossoms were photographed in the Tidal Basin area in Washington DC. Taken by Nicolas Raymond.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 5D Mark III using a EF24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens. A shutter speed of 1/80. An aperture of ƒ/14.0. Focal length of 28.0 mm and ISO 200.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/peaceful-jp-scenery/16696833166/

Some more beautiful cherry blossoms. It’s called “pink ok Kawazu-zakura”.

It was shot on a Sony DSLR-A900 with a 60.0 mm f/5.0 lens. A shutter speed of 1/320. An aperture of ƒ/9.0. Focal length of 60.0 mm and ISO 200.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/scottrsmith/5866981146/

This photo is The Flying Ford Anglia at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal Studios. Taken by Scott Smith.

It was shot on a Canon EOS REBEL T1i with a Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens. A shutter speed of 1/400. An aperture of ƒ/4.5. Focal length of 18.0 mm and ISO 200.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hannesflo/43155267211/

This photograph was taken by Hannes Flo. I love the crisp, blue tones in this photo.

It was shot on a Sony a6000 with a Sony FE 90mm F2.8 Macro G OSS lens. A shutter speed of 1/100. An aperture of ƒ/2.8. Focal length of 90.0 mm and ISO 100.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/dianasch/32133349374/

This photograph was taken by Diana Robinson. The beautiful sunrise was captured in Amboseli National Park in Kenya. The tree is an Umbrella Thorn [Acacia tortillis].

It was shot on a Nikon D500 with a shutter speed of 1/1250. An aperture of ƒ/5.6. Focal length of 500.0 mm and ISO 720.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ppym1/154644746/

The beautiful trunk of the Moreton Bay Fig Tree. This one is approximately 200 years old.

This photo was taken by Prescott Pym on a Canon EOS 350D with a shutter speed of 1/50. An aperture of ƒ/7.1. Focal length of 18.0 mm and ISO 400.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/antrover/16076476030/

I love this foggy forest scene. It’s called Go Forward. Taken by John Westrock in Tiger Mountain / Issaquah, WA.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 5D Mark III using a 35mm lens. A shutter speed of 1/80. An aperture of ƒ/2.0. Focal length of 35.0 mm and ISO 400.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tjflex/9717543245/

This macro shot was taken in Quinault Lake Trails, Olympic National Park, Washington, USA.

It was taken on a Sony SLT-A55V with a 50mm F1.4 lens. A shutter speed of 1/80. An aperture of ƒ/2.0. Focal length of 50.0 mm and ISO 160.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/reupa/23284316564/

This photo was taken by K.H.Reichert. It’s called Refresh me….

It was shot on an Olympus E-M1 with an OLYMPUS M.ZUIKO 40-150mm F2.8 lens. A shutter speed of 1/125. An aperture of ƒ/2.8. Focal length of 73.0 mm and ISO 200.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/bjoern85/40552837802/

I love this macro shot. Great lighting.

This picture was taken by Björn on a Nikon D5500. A shutter speed of 1/250. An aperture of ƒ/3.5. Focal length of 18.0 mm and ISO 125.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/sushicam/6436165671/

This picture was taken by Jeff Laitila. It’s called Two worlds.

It was shot on a Leica Camera AG M9 with a shutter speed of 1/90. An aperture of ƒ/5.7. Focal length of 1/90 and ISO 640.


Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/parksjd/14256230566/

This beautiful Japanese Maple was taken at a Japanese Garden in Portland, Oregon. Captured by photographer Joe Parks.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 6D with a Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens. A shutter speed of 1/30. An aperture of ƒ/5.6. Focal length of 24.0 mm and ISO 100.


Source: www.grungetextures.com

This photo is called Cracked Tree Stump. Taken by Darren Hester.

It was shot on a Canon EOS 20D using a shutter speed of 1/200. An aperture of ƒ/8.0. Focal length of 40.0 mm and ISO 400.

Happy Tree Hunting!

 

 

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